Writing Fiction #Helpfultips

Hi folks,

Writers helping writers is the theme of my non fiction writing help books. Priced low and written concisely, these will help the newbie as well as the seasoned tale spinner.

Get Conflict in Fiction, a short summary about everything you need to know from defining to creating conflict in fiction.

Without conflict, there is no readability. How to create a conflict that will sustain over the course of your story? Pick up the book to find out. The matter is given pointwise for easy understanding.

I am thankful to The Book Club and Rubina Ramesh for pushing me to write this. I never thought of myself as a non fiction author though I have been blogging writing advice for a long time. But the encouragement led me to write this. I extend thanks also to them for the help in editing and formatting the book.

Don’t delay but check out the booklet. It’s available at Amazon kindle store now.

Buy at Amazon. com: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MG6Z56C

Buy at Amazon India:

Plan Your Writing #writetips

Hi everyone!

Here in north India the winters are in full swing. Of course, they are not to be compared with the snow and sub zero temperature zones, but still enough to slow down the pace. I think winters are ideal to get some more of writing time put in. The long evenings when you don’t feel like going out can be adjusted for lots of reading and writing. Do you agree?

So let me ask you. Do you plan your writing? I think planning is a big and important part of adding pace to your work in progress. We can sit down and randomly get down words – and they may be brilliant. But it is comforting and definitely good for your blood pressure if you know you have everything under control including the required writing time for your novel.

How can you plan to write?

First, a good prepping is conducive to writing. Charge your laptop or sharpen your pencils, whatever you like to do. Clean up your desk top and organise your work space. Just the act of making sure you’re ready is enough to put you in the mood to write.

Prepping can include having your favourite beverage at your side. How inviting the atmosphere will be then! The wordsmith in you will not be able to resist it.

Second, know your limit. You should know some goal or scene towards which you’ll be writing. If you’re beginning, you should know your inciting incident. If you’re in the middle, you should know which important point comes next. You can overshoot the mark and write on, but you should know in which direction you’re aiming.

Third, leave research for another time. If you want to get the most out of your writing, don’t stall the flow by pausing to dive into the minutiae. You want to build the current and keep the word count ticking. Either do your research before hand and have your notes handy. Or put a mark where in-depth details are needed and get back to it later.

So, these are the key points in planning your writing time. Do you want to add any more? I would love to hear in the comments.

Happy writing!

Getting back to writing 

All writers feel a passion to write. But sometimes, a writer may get distanced from writing. It may be due to life getting busy, or that certain spark going missing in writing. Writer’s block can grow into a boulder sized obstacle that supresses creativity and makes the writer cringe from penning words. It may be due to a novel that putsthe author into conflict. One doesn’t know how to proceed further and yet cannot take up anything new.

Here are a few ways to get back into the stream when you have left the tide. When you finally have time and leisure, or are mentally ready to write again, what can you do to help you along? Especially when your novel has became that elephant in the room, forcing you to pay attention.

1. Set up a routine.

This is difficult because your routine so far has been writing free. You may rather wander around virtually in the social media. Your friends may miss your presence. Your family may have got used to have you wait on them (all too easy to let them, especially if you are a woman). What you need to do is take a hard look at your schedule and make a time slot and whether you are productive or not, let that time stand.

2. Make a writing corner.

A place for writing is not absolutely necessary if you are into the flow. When the characters start talking, you can write even in the dentist’s waiting room. But during initial return phase, you may need seclusion and focus, both of which can be found in your special writing place. It can be just a small desk in the corner or it can be a proper office, but do create that zone which will tell your subconscious loud and clear that you mean business.


3. Reread your last wip without bias.

From startbto the point you’re done, reread your work in progress. Make notes but don’t change anything. Make a list of the characters in your story. Give some time and thought to each of these and see if they are well etched or need to be more three dimentional. Write a random piece of dialogue between them and see if your creativity wakes up. Maybe soon you’ll be involved in them and getting back to writing. 

So, find the time and the zone and take a deep breath and open the dreaded file. I think opening the file, whether hard or soft copy, is half the battle. Once you start, maybe you’ll recapture that moment which made you start this particular piece and find the core of the story that can provide the drive to your writing. Here’s to finding that lost touch and getting back to writing! *raises tea cup* Who knows your finished bestseller is just waiting to unfold.