Guest post by Author Aditi Chopra – Plot vs Characters #writingtips

Today I have author Aditi Chopra on my blog, talking about the importance of plot versus characters in writing. Please welcome her.

Take it away, Aditi!

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As a writer, do you develop plot first or your characters? For some authors, plot is very important whereas others spend a lot of time on character development. I am fairly new in fiction writing profession, but if I look back at my stories so far, I have invariably always spent my initial time on character development. For each of my stories, I always honed in on the main character – her profession, her needs, desires and personality traits. I asked myself why a reader would find this person interesting. I then went on to develop the appropriate plot.

I believe that as readers, we always invest in people (characters). There are some characters that we completely identify with and there are some characters that we can’t connect with. But invariably what intrigues a reader is the character. If the readers like a character, they will invest time in reading the story.

This doesn’t mean that the plot is not important, it most certainly is. As writers, we definitely need to spend appropriate research and time in plotting. But if you were to ask my preference, I do spend more time or my initial time in character development. If I can bring out my character’s personality in my plot, I am happy with my story.

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Thank you, Aditi! I agree with you one hundred per cent. Relatable characters or at least characters whose motivation you can understand, are the life and breath of a story. Wish you all the best in your writing! 🙂

About the Author

Aditi Chopra writes NRI (Non-Resident Indian) fiction and non-fiction books. Her fiction stories are rooted in Indian tradition and yet very modern. You can find her at www.aditichopra.com

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Writing first draft? Never look back!

Hello there! Some time back I started on a new writing project. I had a new story brimming in my mind. I talked to my editor and what we discussed really set the charting of the characters’ journey in my mind. I wrote out the synopsis and my editor really liked it. I named the characters and they began to ‘talk’ in my mind – which is how a new story always starts for me. Btw what is your process, if/when you write? Do share!

Anyway, I wrote the first scene and then the second. There were a few hitches because when I write, my left brain, the supposed sentinel of logic, walks off whistling blithely. So naturally there were holes. I made the fatal mistake. I went back and reread and began to edit. Uncertainties began to bee-swarm me… maybe the scene shouldn’t start with conversation? Maybe this part of internal pov should be shifted to the next section? Maybe I don’t need this scene AT ALL?

And it went downhill from there.

I wrote more. Then again the internal editor came out and began to thrash my wip. How could this scene fit here? I made changes which led to changes in the previous scene. Which led to doubt in the PREMISE. And toppled the PLOT itself.

Now it wasn’t downhill. It was rock bottom, no, it was in a pit that I had dug it. And then by going over it again and again I kept shovelling dirt till the story just became buried in my own criticism.

I couldn’t go back to the manuscript. I had the least desire to even open the folder now. The story was submerged in the millions of possibilities I had opened to it, instead of the single minded focus with which it began. The fun was gone. And when you aren’t having fun, it shows in your writing.

That is, if you can get yourself to write. I couldn’t. I put that on hold and worked on something else.

What did I get out of it? Two weeks wasted and a flat line on my enthusiasm monitor. But I did get an important lesson out of it. A lesson I knew but for the nth time forgot.

While writing don’t edit. You can’t do both.

John Steinbeck said it best,
“Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.”

However *sigh* people like me can’t make use of advice till it’s passed through the filter of their own painful experience.

If you can stop yourself, do. That’s why Nanowrimo is good for first drafts. Do look back and take stock of the story, do alter your plot if it suits the characters but not while writing the first version. Make notes in colour to remind you what you wanted to edit but DON’T EDIT right now. Second draft is for left brain polishing. For the first, let it go whistling. Trashing scenes is much more fruitful when you have it all down there.

So don’t look back. Don’t attempt to fix it.

Just write.