#AuthorInterview Amit Sharma, author of False Ceilings #TheBookClub

Please welcome author Amit Sharma on my blog. His book False Ceilings is out now. Let us get to know more about Amit and his work through a question and answer session.

How did you become a writer, by chance or by choice?

It was a conscious decision. I have been blogging for a few years and the success of my blog made me wonder if I should try writing a full-length novel. I wasn’t very confident but loved the process when I picked up the project. The reviews by friends were encouraging and that is when I realized that it might just be possible to get published.


Are you a genre writer? Why (or why not)? Which genre appeals to you the most?
 

I am not. While I was writing it, I had no idea what the genre of my first book was. I didn’t want to promote it as a Family saga because you won’t realize it’s about a family till you are halfway through. Till now, I have no idea what the genre of my second book is. But I guess, it’s important to categorize your book to sell it. That is how the world works.

What makes this book special to you?

The fact that I was able to finish it and get it published makes it special. I know I will not feel this way with my second or third book. It’s a special feeling that only your first book can provide. Secondly, the story is very close to my heart. It’s based on true events and a lot of my own angst and frustrations went into creating the characters and how they feel about the world in general. There is a lot of me in the characters.

 A brief description of the book and its main characters.

The story begins with Shakuntala, who is born in the lush mountains of Dalhousie in 1930 to a wealthy builder. As India inches towards her independence, Shakuntala’s world starts crumbling. It is an enormous owl sitting on Shakuntala’s bed that brings evil news and changes her life. On her wedding night in 1946, she is gifted a secret to use wisely when the time comes.

The story moves non-linearly from the green valleys of Dalhousie to a village in Punjab reeling under the communal violence of 1947; from the Delhi of 1950s with its intoxicating smell of freedom to the Delhi of 1970s soaked in the hippie culture; from the Delhi of 1984 smelling of burnt tyres to the Delhi of 1990s raising the Frankenstein of urbanization.

The six protagonists – Shakuntala, Aaryan, Manohar, Vinod, Meena and Lipi – are bound by the cancerous secret for 130 years. It is accidentally passed down, hidden under insecurities and jealousies, locked in its meaninglessness and leaving a trail of ruin.

The story is based on true events. The relationships between the protagonists are real. A few events are fictional and the story is much more about the revelation of the secret in the end. For me it was about getting under the skin of this dysfunctional family, to present them as I saw them in real life, to make their actions and thoughts believable and human.


What are your writing fads or quirks?

 I can’t write in picturesque places. I can either stare at nature or write. I don’t know how writers do both. I need a closed room when I write.
 What’s your take on these writing dilemmas? (Please specify the reason for your choice)

Plotter or pantser?

Plotter definitely. I need the storyline including the beginning and end, the chapter outline and my research work completed before I can even think of writing the first page of my book.

Self-published or traditional?

Traditional. I am not comfortable with the idea of self-publishing but I am not completely averse to it.

Polished first draft or sloppy one?

Sloppy. First draft can never be a polished one for me. I have to go through multiple iterations for it to look acceptable.

Deadline or family/friends time?

No Deadlines for me. I can’t work with deadlines while writing. They are only a part of my day job.

Writing a certain target every day or in floods and droughts?

Floods and Droughts. I usually write over weekend as I am too busy throughout the weekdays. Again, setting a target puts me off writing.

Here’s more about the book. This post is a part of the blog tour hosted by The Book Club.

 

FALSE CEILINGS 
by
AMIT SHARMA
 
 
 
Blurb
Born in the lush mountains of Dalhousie in 1930, Shakuntala is a pampered child of a wealthy builder. On her wedding night she is gifted a secret to use wisely when the time comes. 
 
From the green valleys of Dalhousie to a village in Punjab reeling under the communal violence of 1947; from the Delhi of 1950s with its intoxicating smell of freedom to the Delhi of 1970s soaked in the hippie culture; from the Delhi of 1984 smelling of burnt tyres to the Delhi of 90s raising its Frankenstein of urbanization, the cancerous secret breathes with her, infects her. It is accidentally passed down, hidden under insecurities and jealousies, locked in its meaninglessness and leaving a trail of ruin. 
 
When her great- grandson accidentally discovers the secret in 2065, he is perplexed by the malice that flowed in his family’s blood. Was it just the secret or his family would have destroyed itself even in its absence? Why was their love never greater than their unsaid expectations from each other? 
Grab your copy @
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
 
 
Amit Sharma

 

Amit Sharma’s first fiction book titled False Ceilings has been published by Lifi Publications. The book launch happened on 12 Jan 2016 in the World Book Fair in Delhi. 
 
Amit has been working in a Software Firm since the last ten years. He lives with his family in NCR. His wife is a teacher and they are blessed with a daughter who is in her terrible twos. 
 

 

Amit always keeps a book and a portable reading light in his bag (much to the amusement of his fellow travelers). His other hobbies include watching world cinema, travelling, digging into various cuisines, cooking, listening to music, painting, blogging, making his daughter laugh and helping his wife with her unnecessary and prolonged shopping.
 
Stalk him @ 

 
        
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Guest post by Amit Sharma, author of False Ceilings #TheBookClub

Today I’m hosting author Amit Sharma on my blog. Amit Sharma is the author of ficition novel False Ceilings and is here talking about keeping secrets!

Since your book is about secrets, can you share one secret that you held on to for long in your life?

Over to Amit.

………………

Ok, here is something I have never talked about. When you think of becoming a writer, everyone believes that you are eventually doing it for fame and money. I admit that both of them are important and attractive, especially if you want to be a full-time writer. I will be lying if I say that I do not want either of them. I like fame, but not the one that is too commercial. I like fame when it is meaningful when it comes with respect to your art. I like fame which comes as a peripheral attachment and not something you have worked consciously for.  Ditto for money. I believe you lose direction if you are writing with fame and money as goals. They cannot be at the crux of your writing process. You must write because you love writing because you love creating new worlds. If you are good, the rest will happen on its own.

 More about the author:
Amit Sharma is the author of fiction novel titled False Ceilings by Lifi Publications. The book launch happened on 12 Jan 2016 at the World Book Fair in Delhi. The novel is a Family Saga spanning 130 years (from 1930 to 2065) and takes us through the lives of six protagonists who are bound by a secret and live in Delhi and Dalhousie. 

Amit Sharma has been working in a Software Firm since the last ten years. He lives with his family in NCR. His wife is a teacher and they are blessed with a daughter with an amazing battery life. 

Amit is a voracious reader and devours books. His other hobbies include watching world cinema, traveling, digging into various cuisines, cooking, listening to music, painting, blogging (he used to blog earlier at Mashed Musings), making his daughter laugh and helping his wife with her unnecessary and prolonged shopping.

Thanks for sharing your views, Amit. We wish you the best for your book.