#review Devil’s Cub by Georgette Heyer 

I recently began to re-read These Old Shades which I remember quite well. I was soon engrossed in the book, but before I could read more than a few chapters, I got the chance to read the sequel Devil’s Cub. I was intrigued because I couldn’t remember my first reading of it at all and I began to read eagerly. I had given it five stars, so I was curious to know the story.

​Well, I finished reading it and I must say my second impression is somewhat different than the first one. For one thing, although I find the characters are very well etched and Georgette Heyer hasn’t hesitated from being true to the characters at the risk of alienating the reader and making the hero appear less than likeable, still it rankles that the hero’s character has little to none redeeming features. In fact…

 *warning spoilers* here

… you might almost say that apart from being in love with the heroine – a kind of possessive love – he doesn’t have much to recommend him. GH upholds the nobility of his birth and we’re supposed to understand that it excuses much of his excesses which also make him less boring, which in turn is a sin greater than even attempt to murder. *disclaimer * in case this appears as a negative review, I should assert I’m a fan, and enjoy GH romances very much. Maybe because this was a sequel, she didn’t have much room to play with.

Her style, wit and the flow of narrative is impeccable. Sadly, I found Leonie very silly in the book. She had no role at all. The part which the Duke of Avon played even more mitigated the relevance of putting her in the story. She comes across as a blindly devoted mother and when it’s a son as irredeemable as Vidal is, that doesn’t put her in a good light. There is no motivation for Vidal to be the way he is. If he had to face cruelty or neglect or even being over indulged…but well *shrugs* 

That this tale is an extremely readable and enjoyable one, no one will deny.

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Review: Finding the Angel by Rubina Ramesh #TheBookClub

Finding the Angel is the debut full length romance by Rubina Ramesh and I must say the author has found her place. The story is rightly paced, neither too fast nor too slow. The hero, arrogant, attractive and damaged is bent upon retribution –  the stuff fantasy is made of (though you wouldn’t like them in real life) He’s a man with loose morals and little respect for the heroine. However, the heroine’s love transforms him. A mystical touch to the traditional heirloom makes it more meaningful. Enjoy a glimpse of Indian royalty and sinful luxury in this blow-hot-blow-cold love story.

Warning *spoilers* ahead!
While I enjoyed the way the author writes, I found a few niggles. For instance, I wish he had voiced that he trusted her before he hit upon the evidence. Also, the girl was reminiscent of old Mills and Boon heroine, as at times she didn’t utter a squeak against the hero’s riding roughshod into her life. She could have displayed more spunk, I think.

All in all, a palatial fantasy romance. Read it for the royal setting and well paced story.

#review 1857 Dust of Ages by Vandana Shanker #TheBookClub 

​1857 Dust of Ages is a slim book with a story woven around the events presaging the Mutiny of 1857. It describes the role of British in weakening the Indian royalty and establishing more than a foothold in administration. The book is well researched, the language is simple and the romance which forms the central role in the novella holds attention.

The book is written in a back and forth way switching between past and present. The mystery of the unlikely marriage is maintained and highlighted by the growing dissension between the aristocracy and the British command. The language is passive at times and events jump forward in a ploy to serve the mystery.

Since the book is slim, the story could easily have been written as a novel depicting the whole story. As it is, the ending is abrupt and jarring and leaves the reader wondering why it has been divided into multiple volumes. A clear disclaimer regarding the continuity would also help the readers.

Read it for an imaginative glimpse for colonial India but be prepared to read other volumes to get the whole story.

Find the book details in the book spotlight on this blog:

https://summeritarhayne.com/2017/03/03/spotlight-on-1857-dust-of-ages-by-vandana-shanker-thebookclub/ 

Review and spotlight: Knitted Tales by Rubina Ramesh #TheBookClub

 

 

KNITTED TALES:

A Collection of Emotions

by

 

 

 

Blurb
What forces an innocent girl to become a sex symbol? Her desires? Or cruel fate? 
 
Is a lifetime enough—for avenging a betrayal? How do you hide secrets that never stopped haunting you? 
 
Can vengeance and secrets of your past devastate your present? How can long-buried crimes of yours suddenly raise their head? Can sinning be saving?
 
Is your spouse your soulmate? What if they never understood your feelings? Can you still live with them?
 
Lastly, does life give only two options? Live or die? What if there is a third?
 
In her debut anthology, Rubina Ramesh tries to find answers to these questions that are often from the heart and yet makes the mind ponder over the solution. Or is it the other way round? Either way, Knitted Tales is a bouquet of emotions that is bound to touch both your head and your heart.
Grab your copy @


Amazon India | Amazon USA

Amazon UK | Amazon Canada | Amazon Australia


Check out all the posts here 

 

 

 About the author
Rubina Ramesh is an avid reader, writer, blogger, book reviewer and marketer. She is the founder of The Book Club, an online book publicity group. Her first literary work was published in her school magazine. It gave her immense pride to see her own name at the bottom of the article. She was about 8 years old at that time.  She then went to complete her MBA and after her marriage to her childhood friend, her travel saga started. From The Netherlands to the British Isles she lived her life like an adventure. After a short stint in Malaysia, she finally settled down in the desert state of USA, Arizona.  Living with her DH and two human kids and one doggie kid, Rubina has finally started living the life she had always dreamed about – that of a writer. 
Her other published works include:
 
‘Home is where Love is’ a short story in the anthology Writings from the Heart. Ed. by Beth Ann Masarik. 
‘You Stole My Heart’ and ‘Let me Go’. Short stories as a part of the anthology Long and Short of It by Indireads.
‘Wake Me Up’ as a part of the anthology Marijuana Diaries by Fablery Publishers.
You can stalk her @
 
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My Review: 

Rubina Ramesh’s Knitted Tales is a promising collection of stories. They reflect lateral thinking on the author’s part and are woven together to depict the changing face of Indian society, sometimes towards a darker side and at others, leaning towards a lighter, more hopeful angle. But whether it’s paranormal, romantic or horri-fic (pun intended), each story is written from the heart and leave you musing. The language is simple and the focus is on the flow of ideas. I look forward to reading more from the author.

 

#Review No Safe Zone by Adite Banerjie #TheBookClub 

​Blurb:Qiara Rana will do anything to save her mentor and their non-government organization from ruin. Even if it means visiting the city she had vowed never to return to. But within a few hours of landing in New Delhi, she is being chased by a gunman and is a potential suspect in the murder of a high-profile businessman. The only person she can turn to for help is Kabir Shorey, the man who stood her up ten years ago. Past and present collide in a deadly plot of crime and greed that moves from the cosmopolitan streets of Delhi to the bazaars and villages of Rajasthan.


My review:

No Safe Zone is Adite Banerjie’s third book and probably her most entertaining. The suspense cum romance story focuses on Qaira and Kabir who have to zip from New Delhi to Jaipur while fleeing from danger and nosing out the goons. A lot of colorful setting, some sizzling love scenes and a fast pace defines this book. The villians could have been more three dimensional, but all in all, it is an engaging and fast read.

Available at: http://www.amazon.in/No-Safe-Zone-Adite-Banerjie/dp/9351777758

#Review Paper Towns by John Green

Paper Towns is a piece of fiction by John Green. It can be called as a suspense. I would even call it an emotional suspense.

When you read something moving, you can no longer elaborate on it dispassionately. So I’m not really reviewing but actually going into a discussion about the book. As far as the review portion is concerned, my verdict is, it should be read. Though it might make you feel as frustrated as I felt when I finally put it down. But the whole aura of emotional thriller and the underlying quest of finding the physical person and the person will stimulate your mind. The ending was a bit of a letdown.

**Spoilers alert.**

That is why, I say this is not a review. I can’t opine on things without mentioning what those things are. So, go read the book and then come back here and agree/disagree with me.
There are many things to criticize in this book. Some people behave very unnaturally. There’s much of what teens ‘should’ consider cool. For instance, I saw nothing bad in Q’s parents. They were devoted to him. So why should the author applaud him for lying to them? It seems he wasn’t quite sure if teens can be honest to their parents.

The whole vandalism thing in the beginning was also nothing to write home about.

He overdid the infatuation thing. He could ‘smell’ her in spite of algae and all the romanticism…I realize it was put there to look like it, but still!

And the overriding question. Was the end natural? He loved her enough to chase after her and do everything, not feel angry at her when he finds her (his reaction was way too cool, he was an angel about it all!) and then – when it came to it, he didn’t love her enough to go with her? Mighty unbelievable to me.

Why couldn’t he just ask his parents to help him fly out to the place? Again moot question in the story but valid if you think logically about it after shutting the book.

The character of Margo isn’t justified. That’s the only word I can use. It isn’t justified and so that’s why Q isn’t justified in loving her. Even though that is the point. Still, in the end, he does love her. Or they would have parted with not too many regrets. The waters are muddy here.

However, the ideas in the book are like emotional tantalizers. You do get immersed in the story. Into the book. Brilliant, clever writing. Convincing, clearly depicted characters. It leaves you with more questions than answers. Maybe that’s the point. But in the end, just like it is said in the book…the planning is more fun than reaching…so was the reading more fun than the ending. Q becomes somewhat of a paper boy because he did what a real person wouldn’t and in exalting him, the story was defeated.

going back to Margo, I couldn’t forgive her for her behavior. Were her parents so nasty that she had to be like that? What did I miss? I had the idea that the author went too much into child mind…real and imagined hurts. A teen is more capable of reasoning and evaluation or so I think. She was just a girl. That’s the protagonist’s discovery. But doesn’t he live in the real world? Girls are not like that. So, just a girl wasn’t her either.
Well, it’s a mystery isn’t it? However, I have read whodunits tying up plots more tidily than it did. It manages to hold interest for 300 odd pages. It has some very good quotes and observations. I wish there could have been a big revelation at the end tying everything together. Even with the downsized twist and some overdone moments, it makes to the recommended category.
I give it four stars.

Have you read the book? What are your thoughts on it?

#Review A dog eat dog-food world by Suresh Chandrasekaran #TheBookClub

A dog eat dog-food world by Suresh Chandrasekaran is, as claimed by the blurb, a hilarious pseudo-history of marketing management. That’s an apt summing-up of the book. In fact, the tagline could be made better by adding the word ‘satire’. From tearing down self-aggrandizement of the corporate realm to scoring some bull’s eye hits with humor, this book does it all.

The beginning of the book was rather non-traditional, but in time, you learn to appreciate the italicized introduction to the episodic narration. The story follows a build-up and the final curtain is provided by the allusion which leaves things on an accelerated path. Thus, the pace of the tale as well as that of the narrative is well maintained to the end.

I really enjoyed reading this book. The mockery, the home truths interspersed in the between and the uncanny accurate characterization enrolls you into the humor and makes you appreciate the writing acumen of the author. Underlying it all, is the running theme of what money making means and how businesses are made, not by the utility of their product, but by playing on the psyche of the consumers. In today’s world, that is a fact we have to grasp and maybe even to fight in this money dominated society. It answers the uncomfortable questions like why you consume foods you know are harmful to your health. Why you buy clothes you don’t need. Why you push your children so their achievements can become status symbols for you.

The ultimate line for me in the book was, when the lady asks her husband to buy the Persian cat: “We absolutely have to, James! We will manage somehow. Economise on something less important – like our food, maybe.”

Can our sense of importance grow to such an extent that it overcomes the basic needs? I think it’s a very legit question from the author for today’s times. Let’s hope consumerism doesn’t grow to such an extent in reality as it is shown in pseudohistory!

I give this book five stars. In the initial pages you will find some comparisons rather literary but these are not less enjoyable for being that.

Read it for a witty, well grounded look at the reality of marketing management.

I received a free copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.